Georgetown Celebrates Its Scientific Community of Female Faculty, Students and Alumni
Representing Physical, Computer, social And Life sciences, MathemAtiCs And Medicine

Many women of Georgetown have made dramatic contributions to scientific knowledge over several decades – from the trailblazing research of astronomer and alumna Vera Rubin in the 1970s to today's faculty, who conduct a wide variety of research funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, other government entities and private foundations. The university also continues to support its female students and faculty through grants, scholarships and other means. This feature introduces some of Georgetown's outstanding women in science. 

Vera Rubin (G'54) Vera Rubin (G'54), who confirmed the existence of dark matter, leaves a lasting legacy as a Georgetown alumna, researcher and professor. Read more.

Vera Rubin (G'54)

Vera Rubin (G'54), who confirmed the existence of dark matter, leaves a lasting legacy as a Georgetown alumna, researcher and professor. Read more.

Dr. Sarah Stewart (M'49) Dr. Sarah Stewart (M’49), the first woman to graduate from Georgetown with a medical degree, taught at the university and pioneered the field of viral oncology research. Students and faculty in the School of Medicine created a society to foster a community of learning and service in her honor. A prestigious lecture series also bears her name.  Read more.

Dr. Sarah Stewart (M'49)

Dr. Sarah Stewart (M’49), the first woman to graduate from Georgetown with a medical degree, taught at the university and pioneered the field of viral oncology research. Students and faculty in the School of Medicine created a society to foster a community of learning and service in her honor. A prestigious lecture series also bears her name.  Read more.

Margaret DayHoff Noted biochemist Margaret Dayhoff was a pioneer in the field of bioinformatics as a professor at Georgetown’s Medical Center. The trailblazer developed programmable computer methods to use in comparing protein sequences. She dedicated her career to applying the evolving computational technologies to support advances in biology and medicine. Read more.

Margaret DayHoff

Noted biochemist Margaret Dayhoff was a pioneer in the field of bioinformatics as a professor at Georgetown’s Medical Center. The trailblazer developed programmable computer methods to use in comparing protein sequences. She dedicated her career to applying the evolving computational technologies to support advances in biology and medicine. Read more.


The university's long and storied record of exemplary work by women in the sciences continues with well-funded basic and applied research and efforts that include building a home for interdisciplinary gender-based research, recognizing annually its outstanding women in medicine and promoting science and technology for girls worldwide.

Meet some of the women in Georgetown's science community

Breanna Walsh (C'17), Biology of Global Health Major Biology of global health senior Breanna Walsh (C’17) conducts research in the lab of biology professor Heidi Elmendorf that may one day help identify drugs to combat a common intestinal parasite. Read more.

Breanna Walsh (C'17), Biology of Global Health Major

Biology of global health senior Breanna Walsh (C’17) conducts research in the lab of biology professor Heidi Elmendorf that may one day help identify drugs to combat a common intestinal parasite. Read more.

Chandan Vaidya Cognitive neuroscientist Chandan Vaidya uses a $2 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to determine a more personalized approach to treating children with behavior regulation problems, regardless of their psychiatric diagnoses.

Chandan Vaidya

Cognitive neuroscientist Chandan Vaidya uses a $2 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to determine a more personalized approach to treating children with behavior regulation problems, regardless of their psychiatric diagnoses.

Janet Mann Psychologist and marine biologist Janet Mann has studied bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years. She’s now conducting the first-ever study of dolphins in the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. Read more.

Janet Mann

Psychologist and marine biologist Janet Mann has studied bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Australia, for more than 30 years. She’s now conducting the first-ever study of dolphins in the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. Read more.

Rebecca Ryan Psychology professor Rebecca Ryan finds decline in corporal punishment in America, according to research published in the journal Pediatrics. Read more.

Rebecca Ryan

Psychology professor Rebecca Ryan finds decline in corporal punishment in America, according to research published in the journal Pediatrics. Read more.

Angela Bai (C'17) Biology Major "I went to Antarctica to collect microbial biofilm samples from paleolakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. We are studying these samples because we are interested in looking at theories of long-term cell survival in extreme climates." Read more.

Angela Bai (C'17) Biology Major

"I went to Antarctica to collect microbial biofilm samples from paleolakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys. We are studying these samples because we are interested in looking at theories of long-term cell survival in extreme climates." Read more.

Rebecca Katz Rebecca Katz, associate professor of international health and co-director of Georgetown's Center for Global Health Science and Security, and her team help facilitate a coordinated response to potential microbial outbreaks and pandemics in 22 countries. Read more.

Rebecca Katz

Rebecca Katz, associate professor of international health and co-director of Georgetown's Center for Global Health Science and Security, and her team help facilitate a coordinated response to potential microbial outbreaks and pandemics in 22 countries. Read more.

Tawara Goode Tawara Goode, assistant professor of pediatrics at Georgetown’s Center for Child and Human Development, receives appointment to the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities. Read more.

Tawara Goode

Tawara Goode, assistant professor of pediatrics at Georgetown’s Center for Child and Human Development, receives appointment to the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities. Read more.

Jong-In Hahm Chemistry professor Jong-In Hahm receives the university’s Distinguished Achievement in Research Award for her work with one-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires and nanorods. Read more.

Jong-In Hahm

Chemistry professor Jong-In Hahm receives the university’s Distinguished Achievement in Research Award for her work with one-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires and nanorods. Read more.

Emanuela Del Gado The material properties of a major contributor to climate change – the cement used in concrete – are now better understood, thanks to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science by Georgetown physics professor Emanuela Del Gado and her collaborators. Read more.

Emanuela Del Gado

The material properties of a major contributor to climate change – the cement used in concrete – are now better understood, thanks to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science by Georgetown physics professor Emanuela Del Gado and her collaborators. Read more.

Lisa Singh Lisa Singh, associate professor of computer science, receives an award from the National Science Foundation’s Big Data Science and Engineering Program for developing a report that will provide guidance for furthering big data research, development and education.  Read more.

Lisa Singh

Lisa Singh, associate professor of computer science, receives an award from the National Science Foundation’s Big Data Science and Engineering Program for developing a report that will provide guidance for furthering big data research, development and education.  Read more.

Sarah Stewart Johnson

Georgetown professor Sarah Stewart Johnson leads a National Science Foundation-funded expedition to Antarctica that may one day help solve the question of whether there was ever life on Mars.

Lucile Adams-Campbell Lucile Adams-Campbell, associate director of minority health and health disparities research and professor of oncology at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, joins the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Human Genome Research Institute. Read more.

Lucile Adams-Campbell

Lucile Adams-Campbell, associate director of minority health and health disparities research and professor of oncology at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, joins the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Human Genome Research Institute. Read more.

Toshiko Ichiye Using a recent $ 1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, chemistry professor Toshiko Ichiye conducts research that could contribute to the fight against foodborne illness. Read more.

Toshiko Ichiye

Using a recent $ 1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, chemistry professor Toshiko Ichiye conducts research that could contribute to the fight against foodborne illness. Read more.

Erika Raven (G'17) Erika Raven (G’17), a Ph.D. candidate in Georgetown’s Interdisciplinary Program for Neuroscience, receives the 2017 Marshall Sherfield Fellowship for postdoctoral work in the United Kingdom. Read more.

Erika Raven (G'17)

Erika Raven (G’17), a Ph.D. candidate in Georgetown’s Interdisciplinary Program for Neuroscience, receives the 2017 Marshall Sherfield Fellowship for postdoctoral work in the United Kingdom. Read more.

Guinevere Eden Pediatrics professor Guinevere Eden, director of Georgetown’s Center for the Study of Learning, receives an award from the International Dyslexia Association for her outstanding research in the neural basis of dyslexia and how the brain changes following intervention. Read more.

Guinevere Eden

Pediatrics professor Guinevere Eden, director of Georgetown’s Center for the Study of Learning, receives an award from the International Dyslexia Association for her outstanding research in the neural basis of dyslexia and how the brain changes following intervention. Read more.

Jan LaRocque Georgetown geneticist Jan LaRocque, an assistant professor of human science at the School of Nursing & Health Studies, receives a grant from the National Institutes of Health to support her research on genome stability Read more.

Jan LaRocque

Georgetown geneticist Jan LaRocque, an assistant professor of human science at the School of Nursing & Health Studies, receives a grant from the National Institutes of Health to support her research on genome stability Read more.

Sarah Stoll Chemistry professor Sarah Stoll receives a highly competitive three-year from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Materials Research for her research on the magnetocaloric and magneto-optical effects of magnetic europium chalcogenides based semiconductor alloys. Read more.

Sarah Stoll

Chemistry professor Sarah Stoll receives a highly competitive three-year from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Materials Research for her research on the magnetocaloric and magneto-optical effects of magnetic europium chalcogenides based semiconductor alloys. Read more.

Chunling Yi A new study by oncology professor Chunling Yi shows that inflammation can slow early development of cancer linked to a mutant gene, but once tumors are established inflammation speeds up their growth. Read more.

Chunling Yi

A new study by oncology professor Chunling Yi shows that inflammation can slow early development of cancer linked to a mutant gene, but once tumors are established inflammation speeds up their growth. Read more.

Phyllis Magrab Pediatric professor Phyllis Magrab helps Georgetown students understand longstanding local and global challenges faced by vulnerable children with physical, cognitive, social and behavioral development issues. Read more.

Phyllis Magrab

Pediatric professor Phyllis Magrab helps Georgetown students understand longstanding local and global challenges faced by vulnerable children with physical, cognitive, social and behavioral development issues. Read more.

Shweta Bansal Georgetown biology professor Shweta Bansal and her research team use big data to dig deeper into what causes the spread of flu. Read more.

Shweta Bansal

Georgetown biology professor Shweta Bansal and her research team use big data to dig deeper into what causes the spread of flu. Read more.

Elizabeth Lee (G'17), Ph.D. Candidate in Global Infectious Disease "I'm examining new uses and limitations of medical claims data to enhance real-time disease surveillance and improve epidemiological understanding of seasonal influenza outbreaks in the United States." Read more.

Elizabeth Lee (G'17), Ph.D. Candidate in Global Infectious Disease

"I'm examining new uses and limitations of medical claims data to enhance real-time disease surveillance and improve epidemiological understanding of seasonal influenza outbreaks in the United States." Read more.

Rachel Barr Georgetown College psychology professor Rachel Barr co-edits a new book that examines the latest research in childhood media exposure. Read more.

Rachel Barr

Georgetown College psychology professor Rachel Barr co-edits a new book that examines the latest research in childhood media exposure. Read more.

Grace Hui Yang Grace Hui Yang receives a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation for her exemplary role as a teacher-scholar and researcher. Read more.

Grace Hui Yang

Grace Hui Yang receives a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation for her exemplary role as a teacher-scholar and researcher. Read more.


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